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Shoyu

shoyuShoyu is a soy sauce, which is a dark brown liquid made from soya beans that have undergone a fermentation process. Natural shoyu employs the use of a centuries-old method of fermentation involving a special koji (Aspergillus oryzae), which converts hard-to-digest soy proteins, starches and fats into easily absorbed amino acids, simple sugars and fatty acids. Most commercial shoyu is made by a chemical process in which cereals and soybeans are mixed with acids.

Depending on the ingredients there are different types of soy sauces: - shoyu: this soy sauce is mixture of soya beans and wheat - tamari: this soy sauce is only made from soya beans
Shoyu is the foundation of Japanese cuisine, it is the essential ingredient. Shoyu is the most important condiment used to flavour food and also used to cook with. Shoyu can be found in most grocery stores (Asian food section) or in health stores. Shoyu can be stored at room temperature for up to one year.

Health benefits of shoyu

As opposed to other soyfoods such as tempeh, soymilk or tofu, shoyu does not contain a lot of isoflavones. Therefore eating shoyu may not bring the normal health benefits of soy. Shoyu also contains a lot of salt and should be used sparingly to flavor dishes.

Is shoyu or soy sauce gluten free?

Although shoyu and many other soy sauces are not wheat free, the gluten seem to be no longer present in the final product. We tested two naturally brewed soy sauces (Kikoman and Lima) and gluten levels were below detection limit (<5ppm). More about gluten free soy sauce.

Nutrional values of shoyu (per 100g shoyu):

Water
71.0
g
Energy
53
kcal
Energy
221
kJ
Protein
5.2
g
Fat (total lipid)
0.08
g
Fatty acids, saturated
0.01
g
Fatty acids, mono-unsaturated
0.01
g
Fatty acids, poly-unsaturated
0.04
g
Carbohydrates
8.5
g
Fiber
0.8
g
Ash
15.1
g
Isoflavones
1.6
mg
Calcium, Ca
17.0
mg
Iron, Fe
2.0
mg
Magnesium, Mg
34
mg
Phosphorus, P
110
mg
Potassium, K
180
mg
Sodium, Na
5715
mg
Zinc, Zn
0.37
mg
Copper, Cu
0.11
mg
Manganese, Mn
0.42
mg
Selenium, Se
0.8
µg
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid)
0.0
mg
Thiamin (vitamin B1)
0.05
mg
Riboflavin (vitamin B2)
0.13
mg
Niacin (vitamin B3)
3.36
mg
Panthotenic acid (vitamin B5)
0.32
mg
Vitamin B6
0.17
mg
Folic acid
16
µg
Vitamin B12
0.0
µg
Vitamin A
0
IU
Vitamin E
0.00
mg

[Source: USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference]


Comments

How to make Shoyu

Dear friends, I would like to know how to make Shoyu at home, I will be very gratefull if any one of you can help me. thank you.

Denis - 04 April 2006

How to make Shoyu

Dennis,
that makes two of us, hopeful do-it-yourselfers. Can anyone help? In these times to come, we need to be able to keep alive these traditions when you won't be able to get it at a health store.

Lisa - 17 August 2006

How to make Shoyu

To learn how to make shoyu at home, and to get the necessary koji or koji starter, go to gemcultures.com. Everything you need to get started is there.

macroamerica - 04 March 2007

Is soya sauce toxic?

I read that soya sauce is toxic. What is this story?

JaneH - 21 January 2015

Is soya sauce toxic?

It is all about the presence of chloropropanols. These chemicals are formed in any food containing proteins (cereal, meat, fish, beans, etc.) that has been treated with high concentration of HCL (hydrochloric acid). Natural soya sauces that take almost a year to ripen and form its characteristic flavour do not contain chloropropanals. Chemically produced soy sauce is a much cheaper process! So whenever buying soya sauce make sure its naturally fermented. It should not contain additives such as sugar, flavours or caramel. You should also look for products with the name "shoyu" or "tamari".

Rob - 21 January 2015

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